Your Health 5-24-15 Mold in your home - ABC 33/40 - Birmingham News, Weather, Sports

Your Health: Mold in your home

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BIRMINGHAM - AL -

It must be nice to own your own home.
      But, a local woman's home in Pelham literally takes her breath away.  
     The problem:  mold.
     ABC 33/40's Linda Mays reports to us why the homeowner had to make a life saving decision.

     Usually your home is your safe haven.
     But, doctors say Judy Berneske's  Pelham town home is too unhealthy to live in.
 
     Judy Berneske says, "I apologize for my voice I have an ongoing problem with hoarseness. I think it's partially related to the mold exposure."

     Mold that is the result of a lingering headache for Berneske.
    A complex,  five year, frequent flooding problem possibly involving the attached town home.
   
      The Centers for Disease Control and the Alabama Department of Public Health both warn to protect yourself against mold exposure.  The agencies warn mold can put your health at risk for many problems.
 
    Doctors says Mold may affect people differently.
     
     Judy Berneske says, "Digestive problems,  skin problems, brain fog and lethargy I couldn't do the basics for myself.  I got to the point where I could hardly breath and it felt like I had a weight on my chest and I was afraid if heart problems."

     A local pulmonologist diagnosed Berneske with asthma and rhinitis in February 2010.
     He believed the mold caused her sickness.
     He recommended she get out of the mold-infested town home.

 
      A thorough mold report on Berneske's town home indicates toxic black mold as one of three dangerously high level mold strains found in on indoor surfaces and mold spores filled the indoor air.
 
     Berneske says, "I started feeling worse and when I got diagnosed with asthma I think that's when I decided to moved .  That and my little dog, Gracie started losing hair in patches."

     The 62 year old  thought she be living here in an apartment temporarily to protect her health and Gracie's.  
 
      Now, It's been two and a half years.

     As with any life crisis, moving your residence, living with a poor financial health, and fighting for her uninhabitable, mold-infested home, this disability recipient feels extremely stressed.
     
     Berneske says, "The stress is overwhelming and it's unrelenting.  Just hammering at you 24/7.   I try to get exercise as much as I can. I take my little dog walking, try to get lots of fresh air and sun shine."

    All indoor mold growth, according  state health experts, can be harmful and should be properly removed promptly.

 
    
But, Berneske won't be going back inside her town home's door anytime soon. The underlying problem still is not fixed.

 Judy Berneske says, "I just have to do what I can for my health, trust God and move forward."

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