Feral hogs damage Gardendale yards - ABC 33/40 - Birmingham News, Weather, Sports

Feral hogs damage Gardendale yards

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GARDENDALE - AL -

 

They're eating away at front yards, digging big holes at the golf course, and scaring off family pets. Feral hogs are running wild in Gardendale and the city is looking for a solution. Forestry experts told us, the feral pigs are coming from the "Locust Fork Valley" traveling up the creek, and into subdivisions in Gardendale. They've damaged countless yards and even done some serious damage at the golf course, so city leaders called a special meeting at the civic center to figure out what to do.

"Even in a rural area, sooner or later you may have pigs around your house," Spenser Bradley, Cooperative Extension System said.

And they cause quite a few problems...

"They are in a valley and they're coming up in subdivisions, tearing up people's yards and gardens, flower gardens, and actually people said they have been chased by some!" Mayor Othell Phillips, Gardendale said.

Phillip Burgett says they're ripping up his property.

"We had about 14 hogs in our pasture," he said. "Pretty bad. You can't hardly cut grass with it."

And others showed us pictures with as many as 20 feral hogs grazing their lawns.

"So how do we get rid of them?" Bradley asked the crowd.

The Cooperative Extension System presented a few options including a trap. 

"The stick falls off these bars, and that door drops on them and they're trapped," Bradley explained.

Or... 

"They're delicious! And that's one good thing I can say about wild pigs," Bradley said.

"Every one of these pigs is killed humanely. We use 22 rifles and they die instantly," Bradley said.

Some came to the meeting, just to help out.

"Hunting them has very little impact and Most of the guys in the audience here are interested in hunting the pigs, - you can hunt them, you can hunt them with dogs, you can hunt them in a deer stand, but trapping them by far is the best solution," Andrew Baril, Extension Agent, Alabama Cooperative Extension System said.

This was the first of several meetings. The city must now decide if it will use the traps, where they will go, and how to pay for it all.

 

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